CLS

School Philosophy / Subject Latin



2323 E. 12th St. ∙ The Dalles, Oregon
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Walk-Jog | Subjects We Teach | Composition

Subject: Latin

The language of the ancient Roman empire was named after the people who originally spoke it in Latium, Italy. The Roman republic and empire lasted from about 509 B.C to about A.D. 450. The Latin language was kept in constant use for over a thousand years afterward, even to this day in some places. The English language did not come from Latin, but over half of the words we use today have been imported from the Latin language. Alongside Greek, Latin is the root language for modern science, medicine, law, and the study of the Christian faith. The study of Latin strengthens a student’s understanding of all languages, and since much of it is based on word endings, Latin is easier to study than many other languages. Any student who learns to read Latin today will have an important advantage in life.

We don’t study Latin with the goal of speaking it to others in daily life (though it is possible in some places of the world). Instead, we study Latin because it provides the foundation grammar for western civilization, and teaches the mind how to organize our thoughts. As such, it boosts the capacity for understanding and prepares students for the study of logic and for eloquence.

Depending on their mastery of grammar and reading, Columbia students begin either in an all-Latin textbook containing stories written in Latin, or in a memorization-based textbook meant to introduce only the basics. The former textbook is used in the upper grades classroom, and the latter in the lower grades classroom.

At all levels, students and parents should expect up to 15 minutes of homework each day in order to keep up with the learning required in class. At the lowel level, successful students will include daily reviews of vocabulary flash cards. In the upper level, daily reading practice and short oral or written exercises will do.


Page last modified July 09, 2017, at 01:42 PM by PastorJacobsen.
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